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#FDL: Five Questions

Welcome to #FDL’s feature column, Five Questions, where we ask library staff and other East Peoria residents roughly the same five questions. For our next Five Questions column, we’re interviewing Sarah Baker, one of FDL’s circulation assistants who helps get your library items from point A to point B.

1. Who are you?

I’m so many things – wife, mother, trivia hostess, gardener, herbalist, retired Irish dancer, aspiring writer, kitty rescuer, cook – really, the list goes on and on! And I’m a regular face at the checkout desk.

2. What is your favorite part of working at FDL?

I love knowing that every day I’m at work, I’ve helped at least one person. It might be something simple, but it can make a difference in how the rest of your day plays out. I enjoy helping people find their answers.

3. What are you reading/watching/listening to right now?

I’m watching my way through the first season of Elementary (love it!). I’ve usually got one book and one audiobook going – I’m reading The Serpent and The Rainbow by Wade Davis, The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven by Sherman Alexie and listening to White Night by Jim Butcher. I’m also super jazzed because I’ve got a stack of Attack on Titan: Before the Fall AND Gundam ORIGINS waiting for me (and I’ll probably finish those first).

4. If you didn’t already have your dream job, what would you be doing?

I would love to homestead! I do a fair amount of gardening and canning, but it’s not been a big enough scale to go beyond my home and my family. I’d want to have fresh produce, canned jelly, jam, preserves and chutneys, shrubs and sodas, wine and cider, and baked goods to take to farmer’s markets.

5. What is the best use of a towel in case of dire emergency?

My Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy training says that covering your head will protect you from the Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal (it is the stupidest creature in the entire universe – so profoundly unintelligent that, if you can’t see it, it assumes it can’t see you).

Interviewed by: Carey Gibbons, Reference Specialist

About #FDL

Welcome to #FDL! #FDL is a twice weekly update on all things Fondulac District Library and East Peoria. Twice a week, library staff will make posts that highlight some aspect of library life and relate it to you – our readers. Have you ever wanted to know which Dewey number represented a certain topic? Are you looking for book recommendations based on your favorite television show or television recommendations based on your favorite book? Have you ever wondered about the secret details of librarian life? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then #FDL is for you. We look forward to writing posts that are informative and entertaining and hope that you enjoy getting better acquainted with Fondulac District Library.

#FDL: What happens after you return a library item?

Demystifying Librarian Life – What happens after you return a library item?

Hello, and welcome to another installment of #FDL where we demystify library life and lingo. For this post I went downstairs to the circulation department to talk to one of our circulation and inter-library loan librarians, Theresa Johnston, about what happens to library items after you return them to the library either via circulation desk or drive through book depository. There’s an awful lot that goes into they way library items travel – much like a human body, a library needs a good circulatory system to stay healthy.

At FDL, you can return books inside the library or at a drive through book drop. How often do those depositories get emptied?
The inside book drop gets emptied pretty constantly all day. The drive through book drop gets emptied every hour or so and always first thing in the morning and last thing at night.

Why can’t I put some items in the book drops?
While you can put books, DVDs, and CDs into the book drop, other items have to be returned directly to a librarian, like Launch Pads, puzzles, board games, Rokus, and Speck devices. One of the reasons for this is because some of these things have multiple pieces that we have to count and that should all stay in the same container so nothing gets lost. If a patron puts those items in the book drop, pieces might get separated or broken especially if other items are being piled on top of them. Secondly, some of those items are expensive, and we want to make sure we’re giving the best patron service possible by checking those items back in while you’re in front of this so you can be secure in the definitive knowledge that that item was returned.

How long does it take an item to get from the book drop back to the shelf?
This depends on the time of day and the day of the week in which an item is returned, but most likely within 24 hours. An item is going to get from book drop to shelf more quickly if one of our invaluable pages is on duty to shelve items. But, there are two important things to know in regard to this process:

What happens to items that belong to different libraries? Or items that belong to FDL that I return elsewhere?
One of the great things about the libraries that are part of RAILS is that you can return items to any library within RAILS even if you did not check it out from that same library. For example, if you have an item that belongs to the library in Dunlap, you can return it to FDL. First, the good folks in circulation will check that item in so it is no longer checked out on your library card. Then, they fill out a return label, telling a delivery driver where the item needs go home to. The delivery driver then picks up all items that need to go back to their home libraries and takes them to a delivery hub (the one that serves central IL is conveniently in East Peoria). From there, items are sorted based on where they need to be delivered to. A second delivery driver then takes these sorted items back to their home libraries. While an item is travelling, it is no longer attached to anyone’s library card and considered “in transit.”

What happens if I return an item after the library closes or before the library opens?
People might need to return something at 11:59 on the day it’s due, but unfortunately, FDL isn’t open 24/7. Items that are returned between 9pm and 9am the next day are backdated on a person’s library card to avoid fining them for returning an item when no one is at the library – which isn’t their fault. What that means is, if you return an item at 10pm on say August 1st, the circulation worker who checks it in on August 2nd, still uses the check in date of August 1st.

What happens to items that come back to the library a little worse for wear?
Sometimes, people can be a bit careless with items. Occasionally, libraries have to charge patrons to replace damaged items. However, in the case of easy fixes, like a lightly cracked book spine or a gently scratched DVD, we have repair services. You’d be surprised at how much help tape and glue can be in book repair. If you have a library item that got accidentally damaged, it never hurts to give us a call and ask if it can be fixed.

Post by: Carey Gibbons, Reference Specialist

About #FDL

Welcome to #FDL! #FDL is a twice weekly update on all things Fondulac District Library and East Peoria. Twice a week, library staff will make posts that highlight some aspect of library life and relate it to you – our readers. Have you ever wanted to know which Dewey number represented a certain topic? Are you looking for book recommendations based on your favorite television show or television recommendations based on your favorite book? Have you ever wondered about the secret details of librarian life? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then #FDL is for you. We look forward to writing posts that are informative and entertaining and hope that you enjoy getting better acquainted with Fondulac District Library.

#FDL: Five Facts About 3D Printing

This part of the printer is called a hot-end-assembly. FDL blogger and 3D printer repair woman, Carey Gibbons, replaced the part on the left, which had seen 600 hours of work, with the shiny new part on the right this week.

Did you know that FDL has a 3D printer?

Now you do! Our website has information on how to access our 3D printer related services here. At that link, you can find a general FAQ and another link to our 3D printing request form. But, 3D printing in general is pretty amazing on both small and large scales. Since our own 3D printer just underwent some in-house repairs, I thought it would be a good time to share some 3D printing facts.

  1. Some printers can print with weird materials like chocolate, metal, or wood. Most 3D printers, including the one at FDL, print with two kind of plastic filament – ABS or PLA. While our printer is capable of using ABS, we only use PLA because ABS filament emits toxic fumes. However, some printers are capable of printing with chocolate. Others use metal, mostly for the purpose of casting parts, but uses for metal printing have increased. Popular tech site AdaFruit even has info and tutorials on printing with wood based filament.
  2. The medical community has embraced 3D printing technology. 3D printing has been used in medical technology for everything from creating custom braces for people with broken limbs to models of an individual patient’s brain from MRI scans. And before you think that this technology is only available in the biggest, wealthiest cities of the world, our very own OSF has a model heart library for use in treating patients and saving lives.
  3. 3D printing can take a really long time. Even though FDL’s 3D printer looks like a microwave, 3D printing is not like popping a frozen dinner in one and waiting for it to come out in a couple of minutes. 3D printing takes time – sometimes a lot of time. While 3D printing might seem like magic, it’s slow magic, and patience is key. The longest print job we’ve ever done at FDL took 22 hours. But this guy worked on a model motorcycle for over a year, using plastic filament very similar to what we use at FDL.
  4. 3D printing a gun is highly unrealistic. When the library got a 3D printer, a few people brought up the idea of the 3D printed gun, either because it had been mentioned in the news or was the subject of a popular crime drama. Most 3D printers in commercial areas for public use have a system of checks to prevent weapons of any kind from being printed. For example, at FDL, print requests are reviewed very carefully and any that are deemed dangerous are denied. Both of the 3D print specialists at FDL are well versed in print files and how certain items can be used. For more information, All3DP has a super informative article about the idea of the 3D printed firearm.
  5. But 3D printing in space is not. In 2014, the International Space Station 3D printed its first object – a ratchet wrench. Many more items have been printed since. In fact, the company BeeHex, funded by a grant from NASA, has developed a 3D printer for the sole purpose of printing pizzas for use in space. The future is now, right?

Post by Carey Gibbons, Reference Specialist

About #FDL

Welcome to #FDL! #FDL is a twice weekly update on all things Fondulac District Library and East Peoria. Twice a week, library staff will make posts that highlight some aspect of library life and relate it to you – our readers. Have you ever wanted to know which Dewey number represented a certain topic? Are you looking for book recommendations based on your favorite television show or television recommendations based on your favorite book? Have you ever wondered about the secret details of librarian life? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then #FDL is for you. We look forward to writing posts that are informative and entertaining and hope that you enjoy getting better acquainted with Fondulac District Library.

#FDL: New Fiction for Fall

These titles are up for publication in August and September.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Title: The Bedlam Stacks

Author: Natasha Pulley

Pulley’s follow up to her 2015 novel, The Watchmaker of Filligree Street is a mix of fantasy, steam punk, and magic realism.  The story opens in 1859 England with a bed-ridden Merrick Tremayne, a character who is recovering from terrible leg injury.  Tremayne is soon recruited by the India Office to go on mission to Peru to gather quinine, a cure for malaria.  Filled with tales of a cursed woods, lost time, and animated statues, this novel will appeal to fans of magic realism and fantasy. (Publication: August 2017).

Title: George & Lizzie

Author: Nancy Pearl

NPR’s book commentator, Nancy Pearl, tackles a marriage in distress in her new novel George and Lizzie.  Lizzie, the protagonist, has been married to George for some years but can’t seem to forget her college boyfriend or the psychological consequences of something terrible she did in high school.  George knows that he and Lizzie have issues and that she may not even truly love him, but chooses to ignore their problems and focuses on this dental career instead. (Publication: September 2017)

Title: See What I Have Done

Author: Sarah Schmidt

The infamous case of Lizzie Borden is brought to life in this new novel by Sarah Schmidt.  August 4, 1892 begins when Lizzie claims to find her parents dead in their Massachusetts home. The reason behind their murder is mysterious to those who knew the Bordens.  As investigators try to understand what actually happened on the morning of the killings, the reader is pulled into the various perspectives of Lizzie, her sister Emma, a maid, and a stranger. (Publication: August 2017)

Title: Little Fires Everywhere

Author: Celeste Ng

Little Fires Everywhere focuses on Elena Richardson who is perfectly content with her suburban life in Ohio.  Elena’s life is shaken up by the arrival of Mia Warren, a single mother and artist. When Mia begins renting a home from Elena and her husband, everyone seems drawn to the new neighbors, including the Richardson’s four children.  Mia’s nontraditional life and mysterious past is intriguing, but also threatening to the suburbanites who become determined to uncover her secrets.   (Publication: September 2017)

Post by: Susie Rivera, Reference Specialist

About #FDL

Welcome to #FDL! #FDL is a twice weekly update on all things Fondulac District Library and East Peoria. Twice a week, library staff will make posts that highlight some aspect of library life and relate it to you – our readers. Have you ever wanted to know which Dewey number represented a certain topic? Are you looking for book recommendations based on your favorite television show or television recommendations based on your favorite book? Have you ever wondered about the secret details of librarian life? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then #FDL is for you. We look forward to writing posts that are informative and entertaining and hope that you enjoy getting better acquainted with Fondulac District Library.

#FDL: Five Questions

Tom with one of his favorite comic book series, Locke and Key.

Welcome to #FDL’s feature column, Five Questions, where we ask library staff and other East Peoria residents roughly the same five questions. For our next Five Questions column, we’re interviewing Tom Armbruster, one of FDL’s custodians – helping make FDL a awesome place you want to come to. He’s also a Library Friends volunteer.

1. Who are you?

I am the son of A.J and Mary Ann, brother of Elizabeth and Christopher. Husband of Marie, Father of Chad. I am a bassist, the “Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon” Master of the Universe, a pop culture consumer and (according to my mother) an unsung hero. “I’m trying really hard to be the shepherd.”

2. What is your favorite part of working at FDL?

I like seeing all the behind the scenes  prep work for the exciting programs that the library does. Like the giant SORRY! Board and the Garbage Masher for Star Wars Day. And getting to see all the new and donated books that come in for the main collection and the Friends book sale.

3. What are you reading/watching/listening to right now?

I’m reading Homeward Bound a Paul Simon biography by Peter Ames Carlin, Unmentionable: The Victorian Lady’s Guide to Sex, Marriage and Manners by Therese Oneill and Good Clean Fun: Misadventures in Sawdust at Offerman Woodshop by Nick Offerman (Which is making me want to buy ALL THE TOOLS and make ALL THE THINGS.). I’m watching American Gods, Fargo, Better Call Saul, and recently became obsessed with Rick and Morty (Wubba Lubba Dub Dub!). I’m listening to “The West Wing Weekly” podcast from  Hrishikesh Hirway and Joshua Malina and a mix of “previously unreleased” tracks from Paul Simon on CD. (My car has a CD player.)

4. If you didn’t already have your dream job, what would you be doing?

The Dream Job for me would be to be a professional musician playing bass in a touring band. Don’t need to be a millionaire rockstar, but being onstage and playing music would be a blast.

5. Is there anyone in the DCU who would be able to pick up Thor’s hammer?

Wonder Woman (Marvel Vs. DC) and Superman (JLA/Avengers) both have, but I would also make the argument that Batman could because if Beta Ray Bill could wield it because if he just wanted to protect his people, then Batman, who wants to protect the people of Gotham City, could as well.

Interviewed by Carey Gibbons, Reference Specialist

About #FDL

Welcome to #FDL! #FDL is a twice weekly update on all things Fondulac District Library and East Peoria. Twice a week, library staff will make posts that highlight some aspect of library life and relate it to you – our readers. Have you ever wanted to know which Dewey number represented a certain topic? Are you looking for book recommendations based on your favorite television show or television recommendations based on your favorite book? Have you ever wondered about the secret details of librarian life? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then #FDL is for you. We look forward to writing posts that are informative and entertaining and hope that you enjoy getting better acquainted with Fondulac District Library.

#FDL: Get Ready for the Game of Thrones Premiere

Winter is here and the battle for the throne of Westeros is upon us.  Fans have had to wait an extra three months for season 7 of the popular series to begin this year and the anticipation is at its highest ever.  Now, along with spoilers about the new season, the long awaited sixth book in the series is rumored to be completed by author George R.R. Martin. But, fans are still skeptical as the author is known for taking his time (six years) to write this sequel.

If you are new to the series and are interested in getting caught up on the show, the library owns copies of all six seasons. They are popular right now, but we can always place a hold in our system and get a copy for you from another library if ours is checked out. We will let you know as your items are available.

Fondulac District Library has the entire Song of Ice and Fire series if you’re interested in reading the books. We also have the novels in CD book format or available on streaming audio via one of our downloadable apps. Who knows, you may even get through the entire five novels before the sixth one actually comes out.   The events of the show have surpassed what has happened in the books at the conclusion of season 5 and very beginning of season 6.   It can be confusing as well as intriguing to follow both the show and books, as certain characters who have been killed in the show are still alive in the books.  Also, entire subplots and characters have been eliminated in the show or manipulated into new story lines.

For further reading, those interested in the history of Westeros may enjoy  The World of Ice and Fire, a beautifully illustrated companion book to the series that offers a detailed history of the Seven Kingdoms and the world beyond.

Post by: Susie Rivera, Reference Specialist

About #FDL

Welcome to #FDL! #FDL is a twice weekly update on all things Fondulac District Library and East Peoria. Twice a week, library staff will make posts that highlight some aspect of library life and relate it to you – our readers. Have you ever wanted to know which Dewey number represented a certain topic? Are you looking for book recommendations based on your favorite television show or television recommendations based on your favorite book? Have you ever wondered about the secret details of librarian life? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then #FDL is for you. We look forward to writing posts that are informative and entertaining and hope that you enjoy getting better acquainted with Fondulac District Library.

 

 

#FDL: Instructional DVDs

#FDL: Instructional DVDs

Did you know that FDL has instructional DVDs? I briefly thought about creating a video message about our instructional DVDs, but figured I would stick to writing. But we do have a wide variety of instructional DVDs. I know we’re in the digital age and you can learn a lot of things YouTube, but professionally made instructional DVDs will most likely have a higher quality production value, and can be viewed if you do not have access to the internet at home. FDL has instructional DVDs on a number of things, all located in the Special section of our DVD collection, but here are a few specific selections:

Simple Steps to a Greener Home: Produced by GAIAM, Simple Steps features eco-friendly living guru Danny Seo. Seo provides viewers with a green living guide to everything from remodeling to recycling and and shows that sustainability can also be done in style.

Homestead Blessings: The Art of Gardening: This is one of many Homestead Blessings instructional DVDs and takes us out of the home and into the garden. This guide covers a number of gardening styles, from the small container garden to the multi-acre vegetable garden. It also covers gardening for both food and aesthetics and has information for gardening beginners and the “seasoned” professional.

Learn to See, Learn to Draw: In this DVD, Larry Withers teaches viewers not only how to draw, but how to look at life as an artist in order to better learn how to draw. Withers looks at drawing as a skill and helps viewers to see that once they understand their subject matter, drawing becomes much easier.

30 Minute Yoga for Weight Loss: This is another DVD produced by GAIAM, and features yoga instructor Suzanne Deason. While this DVD says that this is yoga specifically for weight loss, it serves as a great beginner’s guide for people of any body type who want to try yoga for the first time.

Anyone Can Play Guitar: Have you always wanted to learn guitar? This helpful DVD will help you learn with no previous music knowledge on your part. The lessons were developed and the DVD hosted by Vern Juran, who has years of experience in teaching private and group guitar lessons.

These are just a few of the instructional DVDs we have at FDL. Feel free to come by and browse our entire selection!

Post by: Carey Gibbons, Reference Specialist

About #FDL

Welcome to #FDL! #FDL is a twice weekly update on all things Fondulac District Library and East Peoria. Twice a week, library staff will make posts that highlight some aspect of library life and relate it to you – our readers. Have you ever wanted to know which Dewey number represented a certain topic? Are you looking for book recommendations based on your favorite television show or television recommendations based on your favorite book? Have you ever wondered about the secret details of librarian life? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then #FDL is for you. We look forward to writing posts that are informative and entertaining and hope that you enjoy getting better acquainted with Fondulac District Library.

 

#FDL: Where to Find Your Next Great Read

The next time you are looking for a new book, try one of these websites that many librarians love.

Goodreads  Goodreads is a large community of readers and authors. It’s full of book recommendations and reviews.   As a reader myself, I use Goodreads to keep track of the books I have read and want to read.  I no longer make paper reading lists that go missing or get buried in my bag.  I also love reading book reviews on the site.  I’ve never written one myself, but many members enjoy doing this.  Goodreads is also a space where you can connect with friends, join an online bookclub, or get book recommendations based on your reading preferences. It also has a handy app that can be downloaded to a smartphone.

LibraryThing is an online community that can help you to catalog your own book collection.  Just enter title, author, or ISBN information and start a collection.   You can import book information from multiple sources.  A free account allows you to add 200 books, while a paid subscription gives you an unlimited number. It is also a social space where you can find book reviews and other people who have similar tastes in reading.

KDL This database is a librarian’s secret weapon when it comes to knowing what books are in a particular series and their reading order.  A search can be done by author, series name, or title in the series.  KDL is very frequently updated to reflect the most current publications within a particular series, which is a big plus for this database.  You can also print books lists from printer-friendly links provided.

 

Post by: Susie Rivera, Reference Specialist

About #FDL

Welcome to #FDL! #FDL is a twice weekly update on all things Fondulac District Library and East Peoria. Twice a week, library staff will make posts that highlight some aspect of library life and relate it to you – our readers. Have you ever wanted to know which Dewey number represented a certain topic? Are you looking for book recommendations based on your favorite television show or television recommendations based on your favorite book? Have you ever wondered about the secret details of librarian life? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then #FDL is for you. We look forward to writing posts that are informative and entertaining and hope that you enjoy getting better acquainted with Fondulac District Library.

 

 

 

#FDL: What does it mean to “put something on hold?”

Your local library superhero is here to help!

#FDL: Demystifying Librarian Lingo – Putting Items on Hold

Chances are, you’ve come in to the library to get an item and that item isn’t there. You’ve also probably asked a librarian about that item and they’ve offered to put it on hold for you. But what exactly does that mean? The short answer is when you put something on hold, you are now guaranteed to eventually be able to check out that item. But the long answer is more interesting.

Librarians want nothing more than to get library items into your hands. When an item you want is checked out, not all hope is lost. When we ask you, “Would you like me to put book/movie/item X on hold for you?” we’re really asking you two questions: Would you like us to have that item delivered here from another library? And, would you like to add your name to a list of people who also want this item and have us notify you when it becomes available? When you agree to put an item on hold, your library card number becomes attached to that item and as soon as it becomes available, whether your home library’s copy has been returned or a copy from a different library has been delivered, we will contact you. If other people have not also put that item on hold, you’ll probably have access to your requested item pretty quickly. If the item is super popular, like the new Janet Evanovich book or the new season of Orange is the New Black, you won’t get that item until your name comes up as “next” on the list of people who have put it on hold, and that could take a while.

Some things to know about putting an item on hold:

  1. It’s free and zero trouble for librarians to do for you. If you’re worried about it being time consuming for us or that you’ll be too much trouble – don’t! We do this all the time for everyone and we are super happy to do it for you!
  2. You can ask for an item to be put on hold even if you have a library card from a different library (with one exception, which I will get to in a second). If you have a Peoria card and want an item delivered from Dunlap to FDL, no problem! We’ve got you covered. In Central IL, we have this amazing organization called RAILS (Reading Across Illinois Library Systems). They make it possible for people with a card from anywhere in their service area to check out, return, and place holds on books from anywhere in that same service area for free.
  3. The one time when you absolutely have to use your home library to ask for an item to be put on hold is when a librarian has to look for the item you are requesting from outside of the RAILS service area, which librarians refer to as “outside of the system.” The reason for this is that when a library puts an item on hold that is “outside of the system” it costs money to access and ship that item, and a person’s home library is responsible for those costs (even though you as a patron are not).
  4. If you have to put an item on hold that your library owns but is checked out, you don’t necessarily have to wait for that person to bring it back. For example, let’s say you want a copy of The Handmaid’s Tale but FDL’s copy is checked out to someone else. You put the item on hold, and the Morton Library has it on the shelf. You will get an available copy from a different library instead of waiting for a specific library’s copy to come back. We’re good about sharing like that.
  5. Finally, we’re super flexible about putting items on hold and delivering them elsewhere. Do you have a Peoria card but are requesting a hold at FDL and maybe work really close to the library in Pekin? We can put an item on hold for you here at FDL and have that item delivered to Pekin for you for easy pickup. No extra charges or trouble.

If you have any questions about any of this, please ask! We’re here to answer your questions and get you the items you need!

Post by: Carey Gibbons, Reference Specialist

About #FDL

Welcome to #FDL! #FDL is a twice weekly update on all things Fondulac District Library and East Peoria. Twice a week, library staff will make posts that highlight some aspect of library life and relate it to you – our readers. Have you ever wanted to know which Dewey number represented a certain topic? Are you looking for book recommendations based on your favorite television show or television recommendations based on your favorite book? Have you ever wondered about the secret details of librarian life? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then #FDL is for you. We look forward to writing posts that are informative and entertaining and hope that you enjoy getting better acquainted with Fondulac District Library.

#FDL: Historical Highlight

Essential Books About East Peoria and Peoria

If you are interested in the history of East Peoria and Peoria, Fondulac District Library has a collection with various items you can use for research.  These books will start you off in the right direction, especially if you have an interest in old photographs. Click on a cover to find the book in our catalog.

Title: East Peoria

Author: Jeanette Kendall 

This book includes a variety of photographs from various periods in East Peoria’s history, from its early days at the turn of the century to the construction of the Levee District in 2013.  Each photo is accompanied by detailed captions and insights.  Sections are organized by topics including “Life in East Peoria,” “Business,” and “Schools.”

 

Title: Peoria Through Our Eyes: The 1800s to Today

This book, presented by the Journal Star,  is a pictorial history of Peoria from the 1800s to 2012.  It is a compiling of news from 15 decades as well as supporting photos from both public and private sources.  Many contributed to its creation including Bradley University, the Peoria Public Library, and the Peoria Historical Society.

 

Title: Centennial History of East Peoria

Centennial History of East Peoria was commissioned by the City of East Peoria in 1984.  It begins with the earliest settlers of the area in 1812, a time when the land was essentially still wilderness and inhabited by Native Americans. It follows with the construction of businesses and infrastructure. Sections on key periods in history as well as information on local schools, business, and historical homes can also be found.  A digital PDF copy of this book can be found here.

 

 

Title: Peoria, Illinois Revisited in Vinatage Postcards

Authors: Charles A. and La Donna Bobbitt

The development of Peoria to the twenty-first century is chronicled here. This book tells the story of Peoria through postcards that show the many changes that have taken place in the city throughout the years.  This item is a part of our local history collection and can be used in the library only. Patrons are welcome to request it at the Information Desk.

 

 

Post by: Susie Rivera, Reference Specialist

About #FDL

Welcome to #FDL! #FDL is a twice weekly update on all things Fondulac District Library and East Peoria. Twice a week, library staff will make posts that highlight some aspect of library life and relate it to you – our readers. Have you ever wanted to know which Dewey number represented a certain topic? Are you looking for book recommendations based on your favorite television show or television recommendations based on your favorite book? Have you ever wondered about the secret details of librarian life? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then #FDL is for you. We look forward to writing posts that are informative and entertaining and hope that you enjoy getting better acquainted with Fondulac District Library.

imagine, inform, inspire