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New Exhibit on Display from Local Artist Daniel Botkin

Fondulac District Library announces a new exhibit from local artist Daniel Botkin as the latest installment for its ongoing Fine Arts at FDL program.

His mixed media series, Visions of Johanna: The Life and Lyrics of Bob Dylan, will be on display at the library through August. Botkin’s artwork portrays bold and vibrant interpretations of Bob Dylan’s songs, and features thoughtfully executed elements of surrealism. Botkin studied art at Illinois Central College and Illinois State University and graduated with a B.S. in Art. He has exhibited his work in galleries and juried competitions across the nation and has been the recipient of several awards and grants. He also has published three comic books, which are in the archives of the Graphic Novels Collection at Columbia University, and he has recorded three CDs of his music. To learn more about the exhibit, click here, and be sure to stop by the library to enjoy the artwork!

FDL Reads: Salad Cookbooks

FDL Reads Special Edition! A message from Dawn Dickey, Reference Assistant:

It’s too hot to cook, so I’ve been checking out cookbooks. I mostly prefer cookbooks that have nutrition information for each recipe, plenty of photos, and ingredients that are relatively easy to find.-Dawn Dickey, Reference Assistant

Cover image for Cooking Light : big book of salads.Cooking Light Big Book of Salads

Shaun Chavis, ed. 288 pp.

The editors of Cooking Light know how to publish recipes that catch the eye of cooks and consumers. This well-rounded cookbook includes

  • Pictures with every salad recipe + nutritional analysis of each salad
  • Ingredient guides; “100 Calorie Salad Boosters” (like 1 Tablespoon crunchy Chinese noodles); and “Shout-out” sections for various ingredients, like couscous, mangoes, or artichokes
  • Try: Soba noodles with chicken and vegetables p. 123; Greek chicken and barley salad, p. 155

Three Words that Describe this Book:  colorful, helpful, mouth-watering

Give this a try if you like to try easy-to-make recipes that will likely please your palate!

Rating:  5/5 – top notch!!

 

Cover image for Tossed : 200 fast, fresh, and fabulous saladsTossed:  200 Fast, Fresh, and Fabulous Salads

by Jane Lawson. 432 pp.

This cookbook has an intriguing title, but for me, the intrigue stopped there. I think the cookbook tries to be trendy but falls short on practicality. For example, the “poolside” section has a recipe for “marinated baby octopus salad,” not something I’m going to take to the pool any time soon – ditto for recipes asking for quail eggs and smoked trout. Not all the recipes have photos, and the text, interspersed with extra-large words, is annoying. And there is no nutrition information for the recipes – an essential for me. Interesting recipes to try:  chicken with mixed rice, golden raisins, and cashews (p. 254) or Thai-style chicken salad (p. 329).

Three Words that Describe this Book:  trendy suburban eats

Give this a try if you don’t mind slogging through uninspiring text/font to find some interesting recipes.

Rating:  3 out of 5 because of the annoying things & lack of nutrition information

 

Cover image for Salad as a meal : healthy main-dish salads for every seasonSalad as a Meal: Healthy Main-Dish Salads for Every Season

by Patricia Wells. 360 pp.

The title of this book is a bit misleading. The author writes:  “In my own personal definition, a salad as a meal does not need to include lettuce or greens; it can simply be a light and refreshing salad-related entity.” This runs counter to my own definition of “salad” and means that the cookbook contains many types of main dishes. The recipes reflect the author’s location in southern France. For a Midwesterner in the U.S., this poses a challenge in locating ingredients such as fresh mackerel or mussels or buffalo-milk ricotta cheese. There is no nutrition information, and, although there are photos, the photos are often artful garden photos and not photos of the actual dishes. Try:  Provence on a Plate (p.92).

Three Words that Describe this Book:  fresh, flavorful, unique

Give this a try if you like … cooking with a French flair, especially seafood

Rating:  3 out of 5 for interesting recipes but lacking in practicality

FDL Reads: Donner Dinner Party

Cover image for Donner dinner partyDonner Dinner Party (Nathan Hale’s Hazardous Tales) by Nathan Hale

Reviewed by: Sylvia Shults, Circulation

Genre: Historical Fiction (Graphic Novel)

Suggested Age: Tweens, Teens

What is the book about?: Nathan Hale’s Hazardous Tales is a graphic novel series that describes events from history in a way that makes them easy to understand and very, very entertaining. It helps that the author chooses stories that really have the potential to hold an audience’s interest … things like the Donner party tragedy. You say history is boring? Not when Nathan Hale is here to tell those hazardous tales! The secret is that there are two Nathan Hales. Nathan Hale the Revolutionary spy tells the stories, while Nathan Hale the author writes them all down.

My Review: This is some seriously entertaining stuff about some serious subjects. The point of this series is that Nathan Hale, a spy hanged during the American Revolution, puts off his execution, Scheherezade-style, by telling the hangman and the British officer in charge of the hanging tales from American history. It’s a macabre premise for a series, but boy does it work. And the stories Hale shares border on the macabre too. I started off with Donner Dinner Party, curious to see how this could possibly be in any way funny. Hale (both the storyteller and the author) does manage it. Other stories include Harriet Tubman’s story (not macabre but intense), the Battle of the Alamo, and the First World War (Treaties, Trenches, Mud and Blood).

Three Words That Describe This Book: Funny, informative, thrilling

Give This a Try if You Like… History and/or graphic novels.

Rating: 5/5

Find it at the library!

About FDL Reads

FDL ReadsWelcome to FDL Reads, weekly book reviews from Fondulac District Library.  Librarians (and possibly some other guest reviewers) review all types of books, from children’s picture books, young adult favorites, to the latest adult thriller, and share their thoughts each week at fondulaclibrary.org. If the book is owned by Fondulac District Library (or another local library), you’ll see a direct link to the catalog entry and whether or not it is available.  If it is checked out or at another local library, you will be able to place a hold as long as you have your library card and PIN numbers. As with any book review, these are our opinions…we disagree amongst ourselves about books frequently.  We all have different likes and dislikes, which is what makes the world an interesting place. Please enjoy, and keep on reading!

Check Out Puzzles at the Library

Jigsaw puzzles are a fun and relaxing activity to enjoy by yourself or with friends and family. Fondulac District Library offers a variety of puzzles for checkout.

  • Choose from puzzles with 500 or more pieces.
  • Puzzles may be checked out for a one week period and can be renewed one time.
  • A patron may check out up to two puzzles at one time.
  • Puzzles must be checked out and returned at the second floor Information Desk.

Please visit or call the library at (309) 699-3917 with questions.

 

#FDL: Where to Find Your Next Great Read

The next time you are looking for a new book, try one of these websites that many librarians love.

Goodreads  Goodreads is a large community of readers and authors. It’s full of book recommendations and reviews.   As a reader myself, I use Goodreads to keep track of the books I have read and want to read.  I no longer make paper reading lists that go missing or get buried in my bag.  I also love reading book reviews on the site.  I’ve never written one myself, but many members enjoy doing this.  Goodreads is also a space where you can connect with friends, join an online bookclub, or get book recommendations based on your reading preferences. It also has a handy app that can be downloaded to a smartphone.

LibraryThing is an online community that can help you to catalog your own book collection.  Just enter title, author, or ISBN information and start a collection.   You can import book information from multiple sources.  A free account allows you to add 200 books, while a paid subscription gives you an unlimited number. It is also a social space where you can find book reviews and other people who have similar tastes in reading.

KDL This database is a librarian’s secret weapon when it comes to knowing what books are in a particular series and their reading order.  A search can be done by author, series name, or title in the series.  KDL is very frequently updated to reflect the most current publications within a particular series, which is a big plus for this database.  You can also print books lists from printer-friendly links provided.

 

Post by: Susie Rivera, Reference Specialist

About #FDL

Welcome to #FDL! #FDL is a twice weekly update on all things Fondulac District Library and East Peoria. Twice a week, library staff will make posts that highlight some aspect of library life and relate it to you – our readers. Have you ever wanted to know which Dewey number represented a certain topic? Are you looking for book recommendations based on your favorite television show or television recommendations based on your favorite book? Have you ever wondered about the secret details of librarian life? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then #FDL is for you. We look forward to writing posts that are informative and entertaining and hope that you enjoy getting better acquainted with Fondulac District Library.

 

 

 

Introducing the Libby App

Libby is a new app that allows you to access FDL’s eBook and audiobook collection from Alliance Digital Media (via Overdrive). The Libby app offers numerous features and a seamless, user-friendly design. Learn more and download the app for Android, Apple, or Windows 10 here.

Help and support for the app is available at https://help.libbyapp.com and via the Tips & Secrets option in the app’s menu. Additionally, you can access information for getting started with the app here.

Will the Libby app replace the OverDrive app?
No. If you’re a current user of the OverDrive app and love using it, please keep doing so. Whether you’re a new user or a current OverDrive app user interested in a new reading experience, give Libby a try.

Can a user use both the OverDrive app and Libby at the same time?
Yes, but it is recommended to use one or the other for the best experience because the apps are not fully synced.

Please visit or call the library at (309) 699-3917 with questions.

FDL Reads: Landline

Cover image for LandlineLandline by Rainbow Rowell

Reviewed by: Susie Rivera, Reference Specialist

Genre: Speculative Fiction

Suggested Age: Teens, Adults

What is the book about?: Landline is about a marriage in trouble and a magic phone that might have the power to save it.  Georgie and Neal have been together since their college years.  They love each other, but there have been problems in their relationship that have been festering for some time. Georgie is a T.V. show writer in Los Angeles who is very involved with her job.  Neal is a stay-at-home dad who takes care of their two small children. Georgie’s demanding career seems to always come first, and Neal has had enough. The book begins when Neal takes the children away, leaving Georgie behind. Georgie goes to stay with her mom and when she tries to call Neal from a landline phone, she discovers she is talking to Neal in the past. Will this magic phone help fix their marriage before it even starts?  Can she even change the future at all?

My Review: I read this book for FDL’s Out of the Box book club.  We had a great discussion about it.  I was very excited to see it on the upcoming reading list because I have read Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell.  I had very high expectations for Landline because I loved Eleanor and Park so much.  That book was one that I couldn’t put down, and I remember staying up past 1:00 a.m. to find out what happens.  Landline didn’t seem to have the same effect on me. Though I loved Georgie’s character, it was just an okay read.  Overall, I felt the author could and has done better work.

Three Words That Describe This Book: Realistic (except for the magic phone), Romantic, Funny

Give This a Try if You Like… Contemporary fiction with a twist of magic realism, Books about complicated relationships

Rating: 3/5

Find it at the library!

About FDL Reads

FDL ReadsWelcome to FDL Reads, weekly book reviews from Fondulac District Library.  Librarians (and possibly some other guest reviewers) review all types of books, from children’s picture books, young adult favorites, to the latest adult thriller, and share their thoughts each week at fondulaclibrary.org. If the book is owned by Fondulac District Library (or another local library), you’ll see a direct link to the catalog entry and whether or not it is available.  If it is checked out or at another local library, you will be able to place a hold as long as you have your library card and PIN numbers. As with any book review, these are our opinions…we disagree amongst ourselves about books frequently.  We all have different likes and dislikes, which is what makes the world an interesting place. Please enjoy, and keep on reading!

#FDL: What does it mean to “put something on hold?”

Your local library superhero is here to help!

#FDL: Demystifying Librarian Lingo – Putting Items on Hold

Chances are, you’ve come in to the library to get an item and that item isn’t there. You’ve also probably asked a librarian about that item and they’ve offered to put it on hold for you. But what exactly does that mean? The short answer is when you put something on hold, you are now guaranteed to eventually be able to check out that item. But the long answer is more interesting.

Librarians want nothing more than to get library items into your hands. When an item you want is checked out, not all hope is lost. When we ask you, “Would you like me to put book/movie/item X on hold for you?” we’re really asking you two questions: Would you like us to have that item delivered here from another library? And, would you like to add your name to a list of people who also want this item and have us notify you when it becomes available? When you agree to put an item on hold, your library card number becomes attached to that item and as soon as it becomes available, whether your home library’s copy has been returned or a copy from a different library has been delivered, we will contact you. If other people have not also put that item on hold, you’ll probably have access to your requested item pretty quickly. If the item is super popular, like the new Janet Evanovich book or the new season of Orange is the New Black, you won’t get that item until your name comes up as “next” on the list of people who have put it on hold, and that could take a while.

Some things to know about putting an item on hold:

  1. It’s free and zero trouble for librarians to do for you. If you’re worried about it being time consuming for us or that you’ll be too much trouble – don’t! We do this all the time for everyone and we are super happy to do it for you!
  2. You can ask for an item to be put on hold even if you have a library card from a different library (with one exception, which I will get to in a second). If you have a Peoria card and want an item delivered from Dunlap to FDL, no problem! We’ve got you covered. In Central IL, we have this amazing organization called RAILS (Reading Across Illinois Library Systems). They make it possible for people with a card from anywhere in their service area to check out, return, and place holds on books from anywhere in that same service area for free.
  3. The one time when you absolutely have to use your home library to ask for an item to be put on hold is when a librarian has to look for the item you are requesting from outside of the RAILS service area, which librarians refer to as “outside of the system.” The reason for this is that when a library puts an item on hold that is “outside of the system” it costs money to access and ship that item, and a person’s home library is responsible for those costs (even though you as a patron are not).
  4. If you have to put an item on hold that your library owns but is checked out, you don’t necessarily have to wait for that person to bring it back. For example, let’s say you want a copy of The Handmaid’s Tale but FDL’s copy is checked out to someone else. You put the item on hold, and the Morton Library has it on the shelf. You will get an available copy from a different library instead of waiting for a specific library’s copy to come back. We’re good about sharing like that.
  5. Finally, we’re super flexible about putting items on hold and delivering them elsewhere. Do you have a Peoria card but are requesting a hold at FDL and maybe work really close to the library in Pekin? We can put an item on hold for you here at FDL and have that item delivered to Pekin for you for easy pickup. No extra charges or trouble.

If you have any questions about any of this, please ask! We’re here to answer your questions and get you the items you need!

Post by: Carey Gibbons, Reference Specialist

About #FDL

Welcome to #FDL! #FDL is a twice weekly update on all things Fondulac District Library and East Peoria. Twice a week, library staff will make posts that highlight some aspect of library life and relate it to you – our readers. Have you ever wanted to know which Dewey number represented a certain topic? Are you looking for book recommendations based on your favorite television show or television recommendations based on your favorite book? Have you ever wondered about the secret details of librarian life? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then #FDL is for you. We look forward to writing posts that are informative and entertaining and hope that you enjoy getting better acquainted with Fondulac District Library.

#FDL: Historical Highlight

Essential Books About East Peoria and Peoria

If you are interested in the history of East Peoria and Peoria, Fondulac District Library has a collection with various items you can use for research.  These books will start you off in the right direction, especially if you have an interest in old photographs. Click on a cover to find the book in our catalog.

Title: East Peoria

Author: Jeanette Kendall 

This book includes a variety of photographs from various periods in East Peoria’s history, from its early days at the turn of the century to the construction of the Levee District in 2013.  Each photo is accompanied by detailed captions and insights.  Sections are organized by topics including “Life in East Peoria,” “Business,” and “Schools.”

 

Title: Peoria Through Our Eyes: The 1800s to Today

This book, presented by the Journal Star,  is a pictorial history of Peoria from the 1800s to 2012.  It is a compiling of news from 15 decades as well as supporting photos from both public and private sources.  Many contributed to its creation including Bradley University, the Peoria Public Library, and the Peoria Historical Society.

 

Title: Centennial History of East Peoria

Centennial History of East Peoria was commissioned by the City of East Peoria in 1984.  It begins with the earliest settlers of the area in 1812, a time when the land was essentially still wilderness and inhabited by Native Americans. It follows with the construction of businesses and infrastructure. Sections on key periods in history as well as information on local schools, business, and historical homes can also be found.  A digital PDF copy of this book can be found here.

 

 

Title: Peoria, Illinois Revisited in Vinatage Postcards

Authors: Charles A. and La Donna Bobbitt

The development of Peoria to the twenty-first century is chronicled here. This book tells the story of Peoria through postcards that show the many changes that have taken place in the city throughout the years.  This item is a part of our local history collection and can be used in the library only. Patrons are welcome to request it at the Information Desk.

 

 

Post by: Susie Rivera, Reference Specialist

About #FDL

Welcome to #FDL! #FDL is a twice weekly update on all things Fondulac District Library and East Peoria. Twice a week, library staff will make posts that highlight some aspect of library life and relate it to you – our readers. Have you ever wanted to know which Dewey number represented a certain topic? Are you looking for book recommendations based on your favorite television show or television recommendations based on your favorite book? Have you ever wondered about the secret details of librarian life? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then #FDL is for you. We look forward to writing posts that are informative and entertaining and hope that you enjoy getting better acquainted with Fondulac District Library.

#FDL: 2017 Alex Awards

The 2017 Alex Awards (Six Months Late)

Many book awards affiliated with the ALA (American Library Association) are given out in January at the organization’s Midwinter Meeting. But it’s honestly, never too late to celebrate those books that won, especially if we’re celebrating during the summer – a time when we seem to be able to do a lot more reading and potentially need more book suggestions. The Alex Awards are given out by ALA and YALSA (Young Adult Library Services Association) to books that are marketed towards adults but also have high appeal for teen readers. No matter your age, the 2017 Alex Award winners look pretty great, and FDL’s Out of the Box Book Club will be reading one of them in October of this year.

The Queen of Blood by Sarah Beth Durst – A young student and exiled champion join forces to save humanity from spirits bent on killing them in this first installment of what looks to be a major fantasy epic.

The Regional Office is Under Attack! by Manuel Gonzales – The Regional Office exists to protect the world from all manner of evil forces. But someone is looking to take down the Office from within, and young assassin Rose, has been enlisted to help.

In the Country We Love: My Family Divided by Diane Guerrero – This one is non-fiction. Television star Diane Guerrero recounts her life as a young person whose parents and brother were arrested and deported. While, she is allowed to remain in the U.S., she must rely on friends and extended family, while dealing with this traumatizing separation.

Buffering: Unshared Tales of a Life Fully Loaded by Hannah Hart – Another non-fiction, YouTube star and author of My Drunk Kitchen, Hannah Hart is sharing for the first time her memoir – a collection of stories and anecdotes to big to fit into the 140 characters of Twitter. (This is also the October 18th Out of the Box Book Club pick at FDL.)

Arena by Holly Jennings – Kali Ling fights in the weekly Virtual Gaming League’s RAGE tournaments. The battles are digital, but losing is very real. Kali is determined to make a name for herself as the first female RAGE captain ever, but also recognizes that the stresses of this life may be too much to bear.

Every Heart a Doorway by Seanan McGuire – This one I have read and it is so wonderful. Nancy has been enrolled by her parents at Eleanor West’s Home for Wayward Children. She claims to have just returned from time spent in the Land of the Dead, and she must be crazy. Or is she?

Romeo and/or Juliet: A Chooseable-Path Adventure by Ryan North – North takes the Choose Your Own Adventure approach to Shakespeare and has written and illustrated (with the help of guest artists) a version of Romeo and Juliet with hundreds of different possible endings.

Die Young With Me: a Memoir by Rob Rufus – Rob and Nat Rufus are punk rockers. They start their own band and get out of rural West Virginia, experiencing real success. Until Rob is diagnosed a rare form of cancer that has already reached stage four.

The Wasp that Brainwashed the Caterpillar by Matt Simon – Wired writer Matt Simon takes readers on a tour of some of the weirdest and maybe gross ways that animals have used evolution to achieve the basics of life from food to sex. Another non-fiction book, this takes a look at how animals seem to have everything figured out.

The Invisible Life of Ivan Isaenko by Scott Stamback – Ivan is a terminal resident at Mazyr Hospital for Gravely Ill Children in Belarus. Until Polina arrives, he cares about no one and nothing. But Polina changes his life, making Ivan feel something for the first time.

Post By: Carey Gibbons, Reference Specialist

About #FDL

Welcome to #FDL! #FDL is a twice weekly update on all things Fondulac District Library and East Peoria. Twice a week, library staff will make posts that highlight some aspect of library life and relate it to you – our readers. Have you ever wanted to know which Dewey number represented a certain topic? Are you looking for book recommendations based on your favorite television show or television recommendations based on your favorite book? Have you ever wondered about the secret details of librarian life? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then #FDL is for you. We look forward to writing posts that are informative and entertaining and hope that you enjoy getting better acquainted with Fondulac District Library.

imagine, inform, inspire