#FDL: High School Study Night

High School Study Night

One of the really cool things that happens at FDL is our lock-in study night program for students in grades 9 through 12. Twice a year, in May and December, the library opens its doors to high school students only for a few hours on the Sunday night before their midterm or final exams. This December, study night will be on the 17th. The library’s doors close to the public at 5pm and open back up to students at 5:30. Study night usually ends around 8pm. Although we hope students actually get studying done in the time they’re here, there are a couple of other reasons to come to study night.

  1. You get the library all to yourselves. Study night is a time for high school students to come to FDL and check it out without adults taking up all the space and shushing them. FDL has a dedicated Teen Area, but study night is a time for high school students to sit wherever they want and be themselves.
  2. Food. FDL knows that your brain needs fuel. That’s why we provide a wide variety of snacks and drinks for study night. Cookies, candy, chips, crackers, pretzels, soda, and water – it’s all there for you to much on while studying.
  3. Free books. Throughout the year, FDL gets books that are called ARCs. ARC stands for Advance Reader Copy. What that means is the book is not available yet for the general public to buy but will be soon. We get these books to promote them. A number of these books that we get are for teens. FDL holds onto those books for study night and gives them away to the students who show up. They’re pretty good books too.
  4. Gift cards. Before everyone leaves for the night, we do a drawing for gift cards to Barnes & Noble (sometimes Target). Anyone who comes to study night and stays until the end is automatically entered into the drawing.
  5. Extra credit. A lot of high school teachers offer extra credit to students who attend study night and stay for the duration of the event. You’ll have to check to see which teachers offer this, but the extra credit it totally worth it if your grade needs that extra bump.

So, FDL goes all out for study night. Signing up ahead of time is voluntary (you can also sign up at the event) and no ID is required to attend. Just bring your books and your brains – we hope to see you there!

Post by Carey Gibbons, Reference Specialist

About #FDL

Welcome to #FDL! #FDL is a twice weekly update on all things Fondulac District Library and East Peoria. Twice a week, library staff will make posts that highlight some aspect of library life and relate it to you – our readers. Have you ever wanted to know which Dewey number represented a certain topic? Are you looking for book recommendations based on your favorite television show or television recommendations based on your favorite book? Have you ever wondered about the secret details of librarian life? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then #FDL is for you. We look forward to writing posts that are informative and entertaining and hope that you enjoy getting better acquainted with Fondulac District Library.

FDL Reads: From Here to Eternity

34068481From Here to Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death by Caitlin Doughty

Reviewed by: Carey Gibbons, Reference Specialist

Genre: Non-Fiction, Death/Funerary Practices

Suggested Age: Adults

What is the book about?: This book is like a travelogue of death. Caitlin Doughty is a mortician who owns her own funeral home and has been fascinated with death her entire life. In her first book, Smoke Gets in Your Eyes, she discusses her own experiences in caring for the dead. In this book, she takes readers around the world to examine some of the more unusual (to us) death and funerary practices of other cultures. Among other places, we visit a glowing electronic Buddha columbarium in Japan, the most beloved, favor granting ñatitas of Bolivia, and the small (but growing) human remains composting movement in America. Doughty interviews practitioners with each culture she introduces and looks at deathcare from their perspectives.

My Review: I really loved this book and took a lot of comfort from it. Doughty briefly discusses “big funeral” as an industry that has taken over death care, offering very few options for those whose loved ones have passed away. In America, we think that entombed burial or cremation are our only options, and largely that is true. Doughty’s look at the deathcare practices of other cultures is illuminating. She not only covers what these cultures do with human remains but how they feel about death and the people who have died. There is an overarching feeling for many of these cultures that literal care for a person does not end with that person’s death. I especially loved her chapter on the Bolivian ñatitas – skulls that spoke to their current caregivers from the grave to come get them and take care of them in exchange for favors. The ñatitas take on a second life in this new form that is unconnected to the life they lived when they had meat attached. Their caregivers worship and pamper them, lavishing them with clothing (beanies, sunglasses), cigarettes, and even money. That doesn’t seem like a bad post-death gig.

Three Words That Describe This Book: Enlightening, Comforting, Taboo-breaking

Give This a Try if You Like… Stiff (or anything) by Mary Roach, Beetlejuice, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo

Rating: 5/5

Find it at the library!

About FDL Reads

FDL ReadsWelcome to FDL Reads, weekly book reviews from Fondulac District Library.  Librarians (and possibly some other guest reviewers) review all types of books, from children’s picture books, young adult favorites, to the latest adult thriller, and share their thoughts each week at fondulaclibrary.org. If the book is owned by Fondulac District Library (or another local library), you’ll see a direct link to the catalog entry and whether or not it is available.  If it is checked out or at another local library, you will be able to place a hold as long as you have your library card and PIN numbers. As with any book review, these are our opinions…we disagree amongst ourselves about books frequently.  We all have different likes and dislikes, which is what makes the world an interesting place. Please enjoy, and keep on reading!

#FDL: A Year for Philip K. Dick

Philip K. Dick is a science fiction author whose work has been frequently adapted to the big and small screen. You may not have heard of him, but it’s likely that you’ve heard of or seen at least one of these adaptations.  Blade RunnerMinority Report, The Adjustment Bureau, and Total Recall are just a few films based on Dick’s novels or short stories.  I got into reading Dick’s works when I was in my early twenties.  In fact, one of his short story collections, The Short Happy Life of the Brown Oxford, was the first thing I ever ordered on Amazon.

His work is often ironic, and ranges from the alternate history of Man in a High Castle to the highly speculative Ubik. Often, there is some commentary on humanity or warning about advanced technology.

This year has been a big one for Philip K. Dick adaptations.  The critically acclaimed Man in a High Castle, Season 2 streamed on Amazon and now season 3 is in production.  This alternate history explores  a world where the allies lost WWII, resulting in the U.S. being controlled by Japan and Nazi Germany. Also out this year was Blade Runner 2049.  The original Blade Runner was based on Dick’s novel, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Most recently announced is the new Amazon Prime series called Electric Dreams.  This series includes ten episodes, each based on a different short story.  The cast will star Steve Buscemi, Richard Madden, and Anna Paquin, to name a few.

Check Fondulac District Library’s collection of Philip K. Dick’s novels, novellas, and short stories here.

Post by Susie Rivera, Reference Specialist

About #FDL

Welcome to #FDL! #FDL is a twice weekly update on all things Fondulac District Library and East Peoria. Twice a week, library staff will make posts that highlight some aspect of library life and relate it to you – our readers. Have you ever wanted to know which Dewey number represented a certain topic? Are you looking for book recommendations based on your favorite television show or television recommendations based on your favorite book? Have you ever wondered about the secret details of librarian life? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then #FDL is for you. We look forward to writing posts that are informative and entertaining and hope that you enjoy getting better acquainted with Fondulac District Library.

Seasonal Activities at FDL

Fondulac District Library is hosting a variety of events and activities to welcome the winter season!

Snow Day at the Library • November 21 • 10 a.m.
Friends of the Library Holiday Sale • December 7 • 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m. & December 8 • 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m.
Gingerbread House Decorating Workshop • December 9 • 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m.
Music with Tracy: Holiday Edition • December 13 • 10 a.m.
Celebrations Around the World • December 17 • 1 p.m.
How the Grinch Stole Christmas • December 20 • 6-8 p.m.
Nitsch Theatre Arts: NFP Rising Stars • December 28 • 2 p.m.

Please visit or call the library at (309) 699-3917 with questions.

#FDL: No Shave November

No Shave November

In addition to being National Novel Writing Month, November is also known as No Shave November for those taking this time to grow epic facial hair instead of (or in addition to) writing an epic novel. And as always, FDL has you covered with some items of facial hair inspiration.

  1. The Gigantic Beard that was Evil by Stephen Collins. I mean, no one is telling you to grow a giant evil beard. That’s your own decision. But this graphic novel tale of one man’s facial hair run amok is epic in scope. And if your beard needs a little taming, perhaps this book will do the trick.
  2. Star Trek: The Original Series. I believe it is a known fact that somewhere in the multi-verse is another version of you who is evil. And evil you definitely has evil looking facial hair. Thanks to Star Trek and the Mirror Universe, we have Spock’s slick Vulcan goatee. But is it really the facial hair’s fault that alterna-you is evil? And why is all of this facial hair evil in the first place?
  3. Orc Dave in the comic Rat Queens. So, not all beards are evil. Have you ever wanted to grow your facial hair for a good cause? Look no further than Orc Dave in the Dungeons & Dragons inspired comic series Rat Queens. When Orc Dave heals a person wounded in battle, his beard sprouts bluebirds. So, it’s both excellent facial hair and home to small wildlife. 

4. Detective Poirot Mysteries. Maybe you’re not really a beard type of person. Maybe you are more into mustaches. If this is the case, there are few mustaches as notorious as that of the one belonging to Detective Hercule Poirot. You can read about the glory that is his meticulous mustache in the books by Agatha Christie, or you can see the mustache in action on David Suchet on the television series (both at FDL) or check out Kenneth Branaugh as Poirot in the film adaptation of Murder on the Orient Express, opening this weekend.

5. Singh from A Crown for Cold Silver by Alex Marshall. It would be rude of me to leave ladies off of this list as they are also capable of growing excellent facial hair if they so choose. Singh is not a major character in the first book of this dark fantasy trilogy but she plays a major role in the life of our main character, Zosia. She’s also a dual blade wielding war machine with the most glorious mustache in all the land.

Post by Carey Gibbons, Reference Specialist

About #FDL

Welcome to #FDL! #FDL is a twice weekly update on all things Fondulac District Library and East Peoria. Twice a week, library staff will make posts that highlight some aspect of library life and relate it to you – our readers. Have you ever wanted to know which Dewey number represented a certain topic? Are you looking for book recommendations based on your favorite television show or television recommendations based on your favorite book? Have you ever wondered about the secret details of librarian life? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then #FDL is for you. We look forward to writing posts that are informative and entertaining and hope that you enjoy getting better acquainted with Fondulac District Library.

FDL Reads: Best Day Ever

Cover image for Best Day Ever by Kaira Rouda

Reviewed by: Sylvia Shults, Circulation

Genre: Suspense

Suggested Age: Adults

What is the book about?: Paul Strom and his wife, Mia, are headed out of town for a romantic weekend, to spend some quality time together at their vacation house. It will be the best day ever, according to Paul. But Mia’s not so sure. What secrets are they hiding from each other?

My Review: This was a great nail-biter of a book. I love books with an unreliable narrator, and this was a good one. You got the feeling that Paul was up to no good, but just like Mia, you couldn’t put your finger on it at first … the author did a good job of building suspense and letting hints slip every once in a while that Paul was not the perfect husband he seemed to be. Then when you found out the depths of his treachery, that made it so much worse, because you thought for a while he was okay.

Three Words That Describe This Book: Creepy, unsettling, suspenseful

Give This a Try if You Like… Behind Closed Doors, by B.A. Paris

Rating: 4.5/5

Find it at the library!

About FDL Reads

FDL ReadsWelcome to FDL Reads, weekly book reviews from Fondulac District Library.  Librarians (and possibly some other guest reviewers) review all types of books, from children’s picture books, young adult favorites, to the latest adult thriller, and share their thoughts each week at fondulaclibrary.org. If the book is owned by Fondulac District Library (or another local library), you’ll see a direct link to the catalog entry and whether or not it is available.  If it is checked out or at another local library, you will be able to place a hold as long as you have your library card and PIN numbers. As with any book review, these are our opinions…we disagree amongst ourselves about books frequently.  We all have different likes and dislikes, which is what makes the world an interesting place. Please enjoy, and keep on reading!

#FDL: Chipmunk Behavior?

 

When the weather turns cold, many people start craving carbs like bread or baked goods.  Is it our primitive instinct to stock up for the winter or do the holidays just make us feast more on cookies and pie?  Either way, if you’re into baking, these cookbooks are a great place to experiment on a cold, winter day. Click on each cover to find it at the library.

Title: Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day

Authors: Jeff Hertzberg and Zoe Francois

Inspired by the small, old style bakeries of New York City, the authors of this book present a new method of bread making that skips a few of the traditional steps like proofing yeast, kneading, and allowing for a second rise.  Though five minutes is kind of misleading, these shortcuts do make the process faster.  Bakers can make a quick dough recipe in the morning, stick it in a plastic container to refrigerate throughout the day, then bake a fresh loaf for dinner that evening.  Recipes for pizza crust, focaccia, bagels, and more use the same base method with variations.

Title: Baking : More Than 350 Recipes Plus Tips and Techniques 

Author: Better Homes and Gardens

Better Homes and Gardens has created an extensive cookbook focused on baking that includes pictures that will make your mouth water.   Many recipes are accompanied by step-by-step pictures which are very helpful for novice bakers.  But, there are plenty of recipes for the advanced cook as well.   I think that the recipe for pie crust is the best and easiest one I’ve tried.

Title: The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook

Author: Deb Perelman

Blogger Deb Perelman’s cookbook of recipes she prepared in a tiny NYC kitchen will not disappoint bakers.  There are plenty of delectable recipes, from her rasberry riccota scones to her Challah bread. These definitely wouldn’t be categorized under “quick and easy” but for someone who loves baking, what would be better than to spend a chilly Saturday inside making something delicious? Perelman’s second cookbook, The Smitten Kitchen Every Day just came out on October 24th.

If you are looking for a cookbook, Fondulac District Library has an extensive collection!   We have cookbooks for easy meals, special diets, world cuisines, and much more.  The Dewey Decimal number for cooking is  641.5.  Stop in and browse our shelves or ask a librarian if you’re craving something specific.

 

Post by Susie Rivera, Reference Specialist

About #FDL

Welcome to #FDL! #FDL is a twice weekly update on all things Fondulac District Library and East Peoria. Twice a week, library staff will make posts that highlight some aspect of library life and relate it to you – our readers. Have you ever wanted to know which Dewey number represented a certain topic? Are you looking for book recommendations based on your favorite television show or television recommendations based on your favorite book? Have you ever wondered about the secret details of librarian life? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then #FDL is for you. We look forward to writing posts that are informative and entertaining and hope that you enjoy getting better acquainted with Fondulac District Library.

FDL Reads: Mort

386372Mort by Terry Pratchett

Reviewed by: Dave Gibbons, Library Volunteer

Genre: Fantasy

Suggested Age: Adults, Teens

What is the book about?: It’s tough being an apprentice in Discworld – learning a new trade, getting along with co-workers, growing into your place in the world. Mort’s apprenticeship is not made any easier by the simple fact that he has been apprenticed to Death. On the surface an apprenticeship to Death seems like it would be all smiting the enemies of the world and learning the finer points of scythe sharpening. The grim reality is that it is a lot of hard work. This is a fact that will become apparent to all the first time Mort is sent out on his own only to bungle the death of a princess. Now it is up to Mort, with the help of Death’s daughter and maybe even some wizards to try to put everything right lest it wipe out all of reality. No pressure.

My Review: If you don’t like humor and fantasy to mix then this book is absolutely the wrong one for you. Terry Pratchett uses a very “real world” approach to the fantasy genre taking care to point out the weird little quirks of life and making the story feel real. Though this does take place on the magical land of Discworld, the characters, whether human or forces of the very nature of life itself, are the sort that you feel could meet in real life. This is the fifth of the Discworld novels, but a new reader would have no problem jumping right in. This story does not answer the bigger questions of death and reality – rather it takes them out and dances around them, but in a comfortably relatable way that is very down to earth… well as down to earth as Death himself can be.

Three Words That Describe This Book: Humor, Epic, Magical

Give This a Try if You Like… The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett, Squirrelgirl by Ryan North and Erica Henderson

 

Rating: 4/5

Find it at the library!

About FDL Reads

FDL ReadsWelcome to FDL Reads, weekly book reviews from Fondulac District Library.  Librarians (and possibly some other guest reviewers) review all types of books, from children’s picture books, young adult favorites, to the latest adult thriller, and share their thoughts each week at fondulaclibrary.org. If the book is owned by Fondulac District Library (or another local library), you’ll see a direct link to the catalog entry and whether or not it is available.  If it is checked out or at another local library, you will be able to place a hold as long as you have your library card and PIN numbers. As with any book review, these are our opinions…we disagree amongst ourselves about books frequently.  We all have different likes and dislikes, which is what makes the world an interesting place. Please enjoy, and keep on reading!

#FDL: November is NaNoWriMo

National Novel Writing Month starts tomorrow…

For some, November 1st is simply the day after Halloween – a day when you can go out to the store and get some seriously discounted candy. For others, it’s the beginning of a month long rush to get 50,000 coherent words onto paper for National Novel Writing Month, or NaNoWriMo (as the cool kids call it). A lot of people participate in this challenge to crank out the first draft of a novel every year. If you are one of those, here are a couple of the ways that FDL can help you get on the path to that NaNoWriMo badge:

  1. Quiet space. FDL has a couple of study rooms for patron use that are available in two hour increments either be appointment or walk-in. If your two hours are up and no one else is waiting for the room, you can request a third hour. While the rooms aren’t totally sound-proof, you can sit in them to work relatively undisturbed by the rest of the library’s going-ons.
  2. Wi-fi. This might seem like an obvious perk of the library, and maybe you have wi-fi at home, but home is too distracting. Come on over to the library and find yourself a quiet corner. Our wi-fi connection is also password free so you don’t even have to talk to anyone to connect if you’re already in the writing zone.
  3. Inexpensive coffee. Starbucks can be great, but if you’re just looking for a caffeine fix without all the fixings, FDL has you covered. At the circulation desk downstairs, you can get a plain old cup of brain fuel for $1. You also don’t have to wait very long to get it.
  4.  Socialization. Maybe you’ve been typing away at your manuscript alone for too long and it’s time you saw another person for the first time in three days. Come on over to FDL, talk to the librarians, and maybe meet someone else who is also doing NaNoWriMo this year.
  5. Inspiration. NaNoWriMo can be the start of something really great. A ton of authors have turned their NaNo projects into polished, published material. A few went on to become bestsellers. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern, Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen, Wool by Hugh Howey, and Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell all started off as NaNo projects. And they probably weren’t as polished as they are now at the end of the NaNo month. So, get your butt in a seat and get to writing!

Post by Carey Gibbons, Reference Specialist

About #FDL

Welcome to #FDL! #FDL is a twice weekly update on all things Fondulac District Library and East Peoria. Twice a week, library staff will make posts that highlight some aspect of library life and relate it to you – our readers. Have you ever wanted to know which Dewey number represented a certain topic? Are you looking for book recommendations based on your favorite television show or television recommendations based on your favorite book? Have you ever wondered about the secret details of librarian life? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then #FDL is for you. We look forward to writing posts that are informative and entertaining and hope that you enjoy getting better acquainted with Fondulac District Library.

The Friends of Fondulac District Library

The Friends of Fondulac District Library:

  • Promote the library to the community.
  • Maintain the ongoing book sale.
  • Support the library’s collection and facilities.
  • Sponsor and assist library programs for all ages.
  • Meet quarterly. Agendas, minutes, and additional information about the Friends of FDL is available here.
Become a Friend of Fondulac District Library for only $5 per year to support the library and the community! Please visit or call the library at (309)699-3917 with questions.
imagine, inform, inspire